DaveyWavey post this on his wickydkewl YouTube channel:

How does Roman’s story make you feel?

On one hand, it’s the triumphant story of a 95 year old man coming out of the closet – and shedding the weight of a nine-decade secret. That is certainly something worth celebrating!

On the other hand, Roman’s story is also deeply emotional and, at times, quite difficult. At some level, it’s the story of lost opportunities. You can’t help but wonder, had the circumstances been different, how Roman’s story could have ended differently. And you also feel for Roman’s wife. While they undoubtedly loved each other in a deep way, both Roman and his wife deserve passion and sexual intimacy. Did they have that despite Roman being gay? I don’t know.

But despite the story’s complexity, Roman’s desire to feel the heartbeat of someone who loves him is fundamentally human. It’s a simple yearning that drives all of us. In it, we see Roman’s humanity. And we see ourselves.

NEW YORK — Jason Collinswho came out Monday as gay while still an active NBA player, broke one of the last remaining barriers in North America for gays and lesbians in era of constant political gains and ever-growing public acceptance.

In most other realms of public life — including the military, Congress, the corporate boardroom — gays have been taking their place as equals. Until Monday, however, no male athlete had come out as gay while still an active player on any team in the four major North American pro sports leagues.

Jason Collins

“Today’s announcement again shows that gay Americans are our teachers, police officers, nurses, lawyers and even our professional athletes,” said the president of the largest national gay-rights group, Chad Griffin of theHuman Rights Campaign.

“We contribute to every aspect of our American community and deserve the same equal rights as every American,” he said.

Beyond sports, the most dramatic barometer of shifting attitudes has been public opinion onsame-sex marriage. The latest Gallup Poll on that issue pegged national support at 53 percent, up nearly twofold from 27 percent in 1996.

[…]

Read the rest of the story:

U.S. men’s professional sports finally joins gay rights trend – LGBTQ Nation.


I’ve been going through videos in my YouTube subscriptions, and I came across this one this morning. I can really relate to the thoughts this young man expresses in his video, and I suspect that I will be sharing a number of his other videos as well.

From the YouTube subscription:

I know it’s long.

A little after midnight, I took out my camera and began recording anything on my mind. When I got home at 3am, I started playing it back. All night until work at 8am, I worked on this and didn’t know what I wanted to do with it. Until I showed it to a few friends, I finally had enough courage to put this out there…it’s almost like coming out to the world. The ability to be vulnerable this makes feels good, and knowing that it could help someone, makes it easy to handle hater comments.

I came out to my parents at 18. Things were extremely difficult when I already had an interestingly unconventional family. My decision to come out in college came after I pledged halfway into becoming a brother of a popular fraternity on campus. I was terrified of living a lie, dealing with a break-up, and religious convictions. Making everyone think of me as something else would have been the opposite choice of loving and improving myself. Instead of suppressing who I was along with giving my unwarranted situation the opportunity to prevent healing, i helped myself and it has gotten so much better.